Plan A Day Without Hate at your Elementary or Middle School


Timeline

photo of students creating a banner

Use this timeline to help you reach key milestones and have a successful event.

Talking Points

photo of students participating in activity

Use this document to present the idea to your school's administration, student council, peace club or other organization that might sponsor the event.


Suggested Classroom Activities

The following activities were developed by the Jeffco Student Health Advisory Council.

Click on a category or activity name below to learn more!

Time: One lunch block
Group Size: School wide
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Challenge yourself to find a new table to sit at for lunch, with new people. Get to know your peers that you may not talk to everyday.

Discussion Questions:
• What did you learn about someone new that you didn't expect?
• Will you sit with them again?

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Time: Ongoing
Group Size: School wide
Materials: Kindness cards

Instructions:
1) Using a Kindness card recognize a 10 to 20 students for acts of kindness. Give the target person a card which has "Radom Act of Kindness" written on it
2) Carry the card with you and when it seems to be an appropriate time, do a random act of kindness for someone, giving them the card when you do the act of kindness.
3) The cards will be passed on as the next person does another act of kindness.
4) You can modify this activity by using your school's PBIS or other systems for rewarding Positive Behavior.

Discussion Questions:
• How did the acts make you feel?

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Time: Whenever students are in the hallway.
Group Size: Entire school
Materials: Tape, Paper/Posters, and Markers

Instructions:
1) Mark areas within your schools' hallways as "High Five Zones" using posters on the walls, tape on the ground, etc. For the safety of students, refrain from marking "High Five Zones" near or on stairs and hightrafficked or unsupervised hallways. It is recommended to mark hallways where teachers can supervise students and where there is a moderate amount of hallway traffic.
2) Announce to all students that every time someone steps into a "High Five Zone," you must high five other people within that zone, even if you don't know them.

Discussion Questions:
• Did you high five more people that you didn't know than those that you did know? Why or why not?
• How does this activity change the school's environment, if at all?

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Time: 5-20 Minutes
Group Size: 10-45 Students
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Everyone gathers in a circle (sitting/standing as preferred).
2) One person leaves the area.
3) Rest of group chooses a person to lead the actions.
4) Leader will create an action and everyone must follow and continue the action.
5) Person that left will now return and stand in the center. As the Leader changes the action and everyone follows, Center person must figure out who the Leader is.
6) When Leader is distinguished, another round may begin. With the Leader now as the Center person to step out. A new Leader is chosen for the next round.

Discussion Questions:
• Is it important for a leader to stand out? For an idea to spread quickly? Real world applications/examples?

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Time: 5-10 Minutes
Group Size: 10-30 Students
Materials: Chairs

Instructions:
1) All students are seated in chairs arranged in a circle in the classroom.
2) One person is chosen at random and stands up, and their chair is removed from the circle.
3) The student in the middle says "All my neighbors who [something the speaker has done or something that applies to the speaker]" (ex. All my neighbors who have been rock climbing, all my neighbors wearing blue socks, etc.)
4) Seated students who fit into that category stand up from their seats and scurry for a new seat to sit on.
5) There will be one person left in the center of the circle. This person without a seat says the next "all my neighbors" statement.

Discussion Questions:
• What did you learn about people you didn't know before the game?

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Time: 5-10 Minutes
Group Size: 15-30 Students
Materials: Bingo Board print out

Instructions:
1) Each student is given one of the bingo boards. Also, each student should have a writing utensil to work with.
2) Students must walk around and find other kids whose interests/experiences/etc. match a square on the Bingo board. Students will write the name of other kids whose experiences match the squares.
3) When a student gets five in a row, column, or diagonal, they get a bingo and receive a prize.

Discussion Questions:
None

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Time: 5 Minutes
Group Size: 20-30 Students
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Everyone finds a partner and plays rock paper scissors.
2) The winner must then find another winner, and the person that lost is now their cheerleader.
3) This continues until there is only one pair playing and the rest of the room is cheering for one of the competitors.

Discussion Questions:
• How did cheering for someone make the environment better?
• Why is it important to support others, even if they do better or worse than us?
• What were some times where you did better because someone supported you?

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Time: 5-10 Minutes
Group Size: 10-30 Students
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Students must all get in line in order of a certain trait, said by the teacher, without talking. (Example: height, age, etc.)

Discussion Questions:
• What made it easy or hard? Why?
• Would talking have helped?
• What kind of awareness do we cultivate by not talking?
• What patterns did you notice?
• How did you organize yourselves? What forms of nonverbal communication did you use?

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Time: 5-10 Minutes
Group Size: 15-30 Students
Materials: Balloons and string

Instructions:
1) Students tie a balloon attached to a string to their ankle.
2) At the command of the teacher, students then try to pop the balloons of other kids while preventing someone from popping their own balloon.

Discussion Questions:
• What was the best strategy?
• Was this a fun activity?
• What are other unconventional ways to be active?

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Time: 20 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students
Materials: Candy that comes in different colors (Example: skittles, m&ms, sour patch, etc.)

Instructions:
1) Pass out candy to each student (individually packaged or about 3-5 pieces each.)
2) Tell the students what each color represents (colors and answers modifiable from the following: red=hobbies, green=favorite place, blue=something from childhood, yellow=dream job, and orange=anything)
3) Each student will take a turn to pick a candy and share something about themselves.
4) The game can be played until every student has had a turn or until candy runs out.

Discussion Questions:
• None

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Time: Modifiable
Group Size: Modifiable, 10-30 students
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Allow students a few minutes to think of two truths about themselves and one lie. (Think about hobbies, unique experiences, pets, favorites, etc…)
2) Choose one student to go first and recite their statements.
3) Have a show-of-hands vote for each statement. Students vote for the statement they believe is the lie.
4) The student will then reveal the lie and another student will be chosen to go next.

Discussion Questions:
• What did you learn about your peers?
• What surprised you about your peers?
• How can you learn more about your fellow classmates?

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Time: 15 minutes
Group Size: 20-30
Materials: Paper (to make bingo sheets)

Instructions:
1) All Pass out blank bingo sheets (or sheets filled in with hobbies, abilities, experiences) or instruct students to make their own. (i.e. speaks another language, has been out of the country, plays soccer…)
2) Instruct students to walk around the room and find students who have done what is written on their cards.
3) Students who have done what is on the card will sign their names in the corresponding box.
4) The first student who has 5 signatures in a row, column, or diagonally will win.
5) If time allows, wait for a second person to get 5 in a row. Then, if time permits, wait for a student to fill out their entire board.

Discussion Questions:
• Were you surprised about anything you learned about your peers?
• Did you find anything in common with your peers?

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Time: 20-45 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students (groups of 2-5)
Materials: Something to build with (Example: popsicle sticks, newspaper, etc.) and glue/tape.

Instructions:
1) Split students into small groups of 2-5.
2) Give students materials.
3) Give students a task (i.e. make a building with spaghetti and marshmallows, make a bridge with popsicle sticks and glue, etc.)
4) Allow students time to work on their creations.
5) If time permits, students can present them to the class and vote on the best structure.

Discussion Questions:
• None

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Time: 5 Minutes
Group Size: 10-30 Students
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Tell students to form a very tight circle.
2) Instruct them to put their hands in the center of the circle and take someone else's hand.
3) Once everyone is holding hands, tell students to completely undo the "knot" without letting go of each other.
4) Students will have to climb over each other, duck under each other, and move about the "knot" until the knot is "undone" and every student is in between the two people they are holding hands with.
5) Talk to students about teamwork and the benefits of working together.

Discussion Questions:
• None

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Time: 30-40 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students (Groups of 4-6)
Materials: Tape (any kind), Straws (12 per Group), Golf ball, Candy

Instructions:
1) Divide the class into groups. Ensure that this is done as randomly as possible (names from a hat, numbers, etc.) so that students are paired up with people they don't work with often.
2) Give each group 12 straws and 18 inches of tape. Groups will be instructed to use the materials and only the materials provided to build a contraption to catch the golf ball as it is dropped from 10 feet.
3) Groups will have fifteen minutes to build the contraption. Encourage group members to discuss several ideas and plans, and promote group cooperation throughout the project.
4) After the allocated time, gather the class and have each group present their projects. Then have one group member (standing on a desk or chair) drop the golf ball from ten feet. The groups that successfully catch the ball get a small extra prize (ex. candy).

Discussion Questions:
• Who lead this project?
• Who made the plan? Did some groups change their plans? Why?
• Who was responsible for what? Why is sharing responsibility important for these projects?
• Is your group happy with how your project performed?
• Where did you work well as a group? Where could have worked better as a group?
• Why is working as a group important? Is it always necessary?

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Time: 20 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students
Materials: Paper, Tape, and Airplane folding/building instructions.

Instructions:
1) Students will be given paper to make paper airplanes, one per student. Teacher may provide ideas for types of planes students can make (i.e. post picture on boards or have print outs of instructions for the creation of different kinds of planes).
2) Teacher will divide class into two groups and spread them out on either side of a classroom. For ease of execution ensure that desks and/or backpacks are moved to the side.
3) Teacher will tell the class that it has to keep as many of the paper airplanes off of the ground as possible.
4) In two-minute rounds, the class will throw the paper airplanes. Airplanes cannot be held for more than five seconds and must be thrown. When a plane touches the ground, it cannot be picked up.

Discussion Questions:
• Is getting along important for having fun?
• In what ways did we rely on our peers to ensure our planes didn't touch the ground?
• We all had to let go of our plane and trust someone would keep it up. Why is trust important in this activity?
• How can sharing and working with others help our own goals?
• Why do we keep our hopes/dreams/wishes to ourselves?

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Time: 20-30 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students
Materials: Chairs

Instructions:
1) Stand up.
2) Introduce yourself.
3) Answer a simple question (i.e. where were you born?).
4) Identify something unique with the phrase: "Something I've done that no one else has is..."
5) If someone has done the same thing, or something very similar, they will stand up and start the next line.

Discussion Questions:
• What surprised you the most?
• What did you learn from this activity?
• Who surprised you/stood out the most to you?
• Did you like this game?

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Time: 15 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students
Materials: Notecards (with names and instructions) and tape.

Instructions:
1) Pass out note cards face down on desks. These have "labels" like "nerd" and "popular" along with an instruction like "put down everything I say" or "laugh at everything I say."
2) Do not allow students to look at the front of the cards. Instruct students to tape the cards to their foreheads with the words facing out.
3) Have students walk around the room and follow the instructions on the cards.
4) Allow students to talk to each other for around 10 minutes.
5) Instruct students to sit down.
6) Choose a student to guess "who" they are based on how they were treated.
7) Allow other students to do the same.
8) Talk about the harms of bullying and how other people feel when bullied.

Discussion Questions:
• None

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Time: 30-35 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students (Groups of 2)
Materials: None.

Instructions:
1) Teacher will divide class by pairing up students, with any extras being placed in a group of three. Try to ensure students who do not interact much are placed together.
2) Each student in a group will tell their partner(s) about a negative experience he/she has had. Group partners are encouraged to focus on these stories. Stories should be limited to about a minute in length (teachers should remind students of this).
3) Students will practice re-telling to one another in a group, and then retell to the entire classroom.
4) Once students have shared stories, teachers will tell listeners to retell the stories they heard, pointing out potentially positive aspects of the experience.

Discussion Questions:
• What did you learn about your situation from your partner that you did not see before?
• Why is another persons' perspective important?
• What did you discover about others today that you did not know about them before?
• Why should we value the life-experiences, positive or negative, of others?
• In what ways can we try to be more understanding?

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Time: 15 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students
Materials: Poster (12 feet long), Marker, Tape, and Candy.

Instructions:
1) Teacher will hang poster on a clear wall so that the top of the poster rests at about twelve feet. This does not have to be exact, but a student will be jumping so it is important to ensure that they do not jump above the top of the poster.
2) Teacher will address the class and choose one student at random.The teacher will tell the class to be quiet, and then tell the chosen student to jump and mark as high as possible with the marker.
3) Once the student has done this, the teacher will tell them to repeat again, this time jumping higher to beat their record.This is repeated until the student says they cannot jump any higher or if the marks on the poster are beginning to get lower.
4) The teacher will then bring out the hidden candy and explain that if the chosen student can jump high enough and beat all of their previous attempts, the class will all get candy. If the student can't, the class does not get candy.
5) The teacher will then tell the class that they are now allowed to talk and encourage their peer, but only with positive language, to jump higher.

Discussion Questions:
• How did it feel to be cheered on by team?
• How did it feel to be under pressure to perform? How did that change your mentality?
• Do we rely on other individuals for the success of a task in life? When? Where?
• Would negative words/threats been more effective in helping the student jump?
• Does this activity change your views on how peer pressure can change the mentality of a group?
• Where have you all had to be the one key member/key player in a group project or event?
• How was your group's attitude influential to your success?
• Should groups be more positive or more negative? Why?

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Time: 25-35 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students
Materials: Paper, Poster, White board, Markers, and Dry erase markers.

Instructions:
1) The teacher will write the statement "My vision of a great classroom environment is..." and then pass out a sticky note/piece of scrap paper to each student.
2) Students are expected to write on their papers a statement that finished the one written on the board.
3) Next, the teacher will have students join into groups of 4 to 5 and discuss amongst themselves the statements they wrote. In these groups students will decide and workshop which of the statements embodies the spirit of the group.
4) Groups will share out their collective statements to the class, and the teacher will write these statements on the board.
5) As a class, students will determine which aspects of the statements written on the board embody the spirit of the class. As a class, students will refine the statement to a one-sentence mission statement, which the class will agree to abide by.

Discussion Questions:
• What is surprising/different/unusual/unexpected about our mission statement? Do you feel it represents fair treatment in the classroom? Why?
• Do we all share basic standards of respect and fair treatment? Why or why not?
• What can we do to understand how others would like to be treated?
• Where could we show more respect to one another in the classroom?
• Do we show a different level of respect to our friends/family than we do to our teachers/peers? Why is it different? Should it be different?
• Are their more mission statements that we could have for the classroom? Which statements stood out that we did not include? Why do they stand out?

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Time: 15-20 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students
Materials: Ball of yarn/string, and an Inflated balloon.

Instructions:
1) Gather students in a circle. The teacher explains that students will hold onto one end of the ball of string and throw the string to another student who has none.
2) The student who throws the ball of string has to say something they appreciate about the person they threw the string to and why.
3) Repeat until everyone has had a turn.
4) Once everyone has a hold of the string, the teacher will explain that through the classrooms appreciation of one another, they've made a "web of connection" that gives them a chance to support the balloon. The teacher explains that the group cannot let the balloon touch the ground.(The group, as this was their first pass with the string, will likely be unable to hold the balloon up for long)
5) The teacher will then have the group perform the same exercise again, tossing the ball of string to new people until everyone is holding onto two strings.
6) The teacher will toss the balloon in again, and the group as a whole should be able to keep the balloon up for longer.

Discussion Questions:
• Have you ever felt unappreciated working in a group? Why?
• Does a feeling of appreciation help build camaraderie and teamwork?
• Is it important to share with group members about not only the things they do wrong, but the things they do well?
• Why is teamwork important?
• Can there ever be too much/too little teamwork? Why?
• How can we become a better team?
• Why is showing appreciation towards other team members important to the whole team?
• Where can we better our team building skills? Where, outside of school, can we use teamwork?

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Time: 10-20 Minutes
Group Size: 25 Students
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Sit in a circle.
2) Teacher starts by picking random object in the classroom (i.e. board, desk, chair, pencil).
3) Student to the right tells of a problem they've had with that object or a one-sentence story involving them and the object.
4) Continue around the circle.

Discussion Questions:
• What did you hear that surprised you the most?
• Was it hard for you to share?
• Did you like sharing?

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Time: 5 to 15 minutes
Group Size: No Limit
Materials: Paper and Pencil

Instructions:
1) Write a poem based on the following format:
I am [First Name]
I am a [3 roles you have]
I am [4 adjectives that best describes you]
I enjoy [3 things you enjoy]
I want to [2 things you want to do in life]
I am [First and Last Name]

Example:
I am Bobby
I am a friend, son, brother
I am funny, smart, athletic, friendly
I enjoy playing football, hanging out with friends, not having homework
I want to become a doctor, become a star athlete
I am Bobby Williams

2) Share poem with a partner small groups or the entire class
3) In partnership or in small groups have conversations using the discussion questions

Discussion Questions:
• Was there anything that stood out to you?
• Did you learn something new about yourself or someone else?
• Was the poem hard to write? How? Why?

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Time: 60 Minutes
Group Size: Entire Class
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Have the class sit in a circle or somehow take turns.
2) Tell the class to think of an animal that has qualities they would want to have. Teacher should give an example to the class by saying, "Hi, my name is Mark, and if I were an animal, I would want to be a bear because I work very hard and don't get enough sleep. If I were a bear, I would be able to hibernate."
3) Give the class some time to think about what animals they would want to be and why. Have people who are ready go first, and then have the person next to them continue.

Discussion Questions:
• Did anyone's animal choices surprise you? Why?
• Did you want to change your original answer based on what someone else said? What made you want to change your answer?

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Time: 30-40 Minutes
Group Size: Entire Class
Materials: A sheet that has facts about students/paper and pencils/pens.

Instructions:
1) Teachers should create a sheet with questions that students can answer about themselves (i.e. favorite food, hobbies, birthplace, etc.) or students can be asked to write on a piece of paper a list of unique things about themselves. The things listed should be kept to a total of 5-10 facts. Tell the students not to write their names.
2) Give students time to fill out their papers without anyone looking at each other's work. Collect papers as everyone finishes.
3) Shuffle the papers and hand them back out to students. Make sure no one gets their own paper back.
4) Tell students that the paper they were handed is for their eyes only. Students have to go around and ask their classmates information about themselves, in order to find out whose paper they got. They have to be "detectives", and the paper has their "clues" of the "suspect" they are searching for.

Discussion Questions:
• Was it hard or easy to find your "suspect"? Why?
• Did you learn something new about your "suspect"? What about your classmates?

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Time: 60 Minutes
Group Size: Entire Class
Materials: Paper bags and Markers

Instructions:
1) Give each student a bag. They can choose to draw or decorate their bags.
2) Tell students that these are "Me" Bags, and that they can put 3-5 items inside that represent themselves. (i.e. seashells might represent that the student is from a town near the ocean, a golf ball might represent that the student likes sports, a stuffed animal might represent the student's favorite childhood toy, etc.)
3) Send students home with their "me" bags and tell them to collect their items. Tell students they will be "show-and-telling" the next day.
4) Have students share what their items mean. If time allows, allow classmates to ask the student presenting some questions about further meaning of their items.

Discussion Questions:
• Did anyone share something unexpected about their items?
• Did anyone bring similar items? Were their stories the same or different?
• Was there anyone who brought in an item that was interesting to you? Why did it stick out?
• What did you learn about your classmates?

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Time: 60 Minutes
Group Size: Entire Class
Materials: A roll of toilet paper

Instructions:
1) Find a new roll of toilet paper (for cleanliness). Tell the class to sit in a circle.
2) Tell students to take as many pieces of toilet paper as they want, then pass it around.
3) Once everyone has their toilet paper, tell students that depending on how many pieces they got, they have to share that many things about themselves (i.e. If the student chose 50 pieces of toilet paper, they have to share 50 things about themselves).
4) If someone has trouble coming up with things to share, allow pieces of toilet paper to be replaced with questions from the rest of the class.

Discussion Questions:
• Was it hard to come up with things to share based on the number of pieces you chose? Was it easy?
• Was there anyone who chose a lot of pieces and was able to come up with that many things to share?
• Did you learn something new about your classmates?

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Time: 60 Minutes
Group Size: Entire Class
Materials: Cards with "bizarre" questions

Instructions:
1) Preferably on 3x5 cards, come up with "bizarre" questions to ask your class (i.e. What is a strange pet peeve that you have? If you could have been a prodigy as a child, what would have been your talent? If you could live in a fairy tale, which one would it be and who would you be? What are the strangest books you have ever read? Have you ever eaten an insect? Etc.)
2) Pass out the cards so that each student has one. Allow students to think about their answers before sharing.
3) Students can share voluntarily. They do not have to go around in a circle as they share the questions they got and their answers.

Discussion Questions:
• Did people have interesting answers to their bizarre question?
• Whose answer stuck out to you the most?
• Did you learn something bizarre about your classmates?

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Time: 60 Minutes
Group Size: Entire Class
Materials: Paper and Pens/Pencils

Instructions:
1) Tell students to write down 5-10 things about themselves on a piece of paper, but don't write down any names.
2) Clear the room of any desks or go to an open space. Tell students to crumple up their papers, and when you say, "go", start throwing the papers. This will create a "snowball fight." Remind students to not purposely hurt anyone.
3) After a few minutes, tell students to stop throwing the "snowballs." Allow students to pick up one paper and read it.
4) Have students go around and try to figure out the person who made the "snowball."

Discussion Questions:
• Whose snowball did you get?
• Was it hard to find your snowball's owner?
• What did you learn about the person you got?

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Time: 15 Minutes
Group Size: 5-30 Students
Materials: Paper and pencils/pens

Instructions:
1) Pieces of paper with the student's names are passed around.
2) Each student writes a compliment to the student named on the paper.

Discussion Questions:
• How did that make you feel?
• How often should you compliment others?

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Time: 15-30 Minutes
Group Size: 15-30 Students
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) All players lie in random formation in the area. Lights are turned off to allow peaceful ambiance.
2) After everyone is down, and all eyes are shut, 3 to 5 players are chosen (depending on size of group) randomly by silently tapping the shoulder. These chosen may stand up silently and move to one side of the down players.
3) Proctor will say "Tap someone..." with a phrase or quality such as "who has shown you support" "that you admire" "that you think is smart" "that is humble" "that you would like to get to know" etc.
4) The chosen students will move silently among the down students and tap 3 to 5 that they feel applies to the proctor's statement. After two to four rounds, have the chosen students lay down, and the proctor will choose a different bunch of students.
5) There is no talking other than the proctor - loses anonymity if students know who is who.

Discussion Questions:
• Were you surprised by any of the things that you were tapped for?
• Do you feel closer to your peers?
• How did you feel from the appreciation? Why did it have to be anonymous? Does it have to be anonymous in the future? Is it worth showing appreciation?

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Time: 5-10 Minutes
Group Size: 5-30 Students
Materials: Blindfolds and any classroom objects

Instructions:
1) Students pair off.
2) Objects are scattered around the room. Do not move desks, but do clear backpacks off the floor.
3) One partner starts on one side of the classroom.
4) The other partner starts at the opposite end of the classroom and is blindfolded.
5) They are set loose out on the obstacle, while the other verbally guides the blindfolded partner around or over objects.

Discussion Questions:
• What made you trust your partner more?
• Did you feel safe? Or not? Why?

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Time: 2-20 Minutes (2 minutes per round)
Group Size: 5-30 Students
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Students gather seated in a circle.
2) One student is chosen from the group at a time to sit in the hot seat for either 30 seconds, 1 minute or 2 minutes [depending on instructor discretion], in which the other students may ask them anything, and they must answer as much as possible. If they feel uncomfortable answering a question they say "Hot Seat" and the class automatically, without question, moves on. Then the student in the hot seat chooses the next student to go.
3) No student can go twice. Everyone may not be able to go.

Discussion Questions:
• Why is privacy important? Is privacy good or bad amongst peers?
• Does peer pressure influence our willingness to share?

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Time: 40-60 Minutes
Group Size: 30 Students (Groups of 3-5)
Materials: Paper (with "people"), hat, white board, and dry erase markers.

Instructions:
1) Students are expected to civilly listen to the opinions of others and either agree or debate in an appropriate manner. Name call, yelling, or personal accusations are off limits.
2) Teacher will divide class into groups of 3 to 5. After placing the names in a hat, the teacher will pull out 10 names at random, having a student write the names on the board.
3) The teacher will explain to the class that these are the names of occupations/people who were on a boat. However, the boat is sinking, and there is only one life raft, capable of holding only 6 people. Students are expected to determine which 6 of the 10 people drawn deserve to escape in the lifeboat.
4) Students will be given ten minutes to discuss the situation amongst their group and make a rough list of who goes into the lifeboat. The rest of the time, students will share out their lists to the class and as a class determine a "master list" of who is to be saved. Have one group at random write their idea of the list on the board, and then go around the classroom asking if other students have ideas of which people should or shouldn't be on the list and why.

Discussion Questions:
• Were some roles more emotional/controversial than others? Why?
• What can emotions do for us in a negotiation situation? How can they benefit us? How can they harm us?
• Was it harder or easier to defend your opinions with some roles more than others?
• Why is it important to understand another's motivations?
• Is there a difference between understanding and knowing someone? What is the difference?
• Where do our opinions come from? Why are they important to us as individuals and to the groups we work with?

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Time: 20 to 30 minutes
Group Size: Ideal is 25 so that everyone has a chance to share
Materials: None

Instructions:
1) Have students sit in a circle
2) Go around the circle sharing a favorite childhood memory
3) Activity works best when student lead and facilitated

Discussion Questions:
• What story stuck out to you the most?
• Did you learn something new about everyone in the circle?
• Could you relate to anything?
• Do you feel closer to your peers?

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Time: 15 to 25 minutes
Group Size: No Limit
Materials: Article from New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/04/us/04suicide.html?_r=1

Instructions:
1) print out enough copies for the class
2) close read
3) analyze
4) discuss
5) This activity can be modified by using any article, short story news clip etc. that might be more relevant to your classroom

Discussion Questions:
• What shocked you? How? Why?
• After reading this article, will you be more careful with your words and actions towards others?
• Was there ever a time when you felt you were treated unfairly based on your social status, appearance, sexuality, race, color, gender?
• What would you do if you were in the same situation?
• If you saw another student being harassed, would you intervene? Why or why not?
• Would you rather save a life or be just a bystander?

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Sponsor Logos: Jeffco Public Schools, Kaiser Permanente, SHAC Attack

Anti-bullying Curriculum and Assembly Ideas

Click here for links to suggestions for anti-bullying/nonviolence curriculum.

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